Brand new episode of the BAFTA-award winning It Was Alright in the 70s to air 20th September on Channel 4

16 September 2016

Brand new episode of the BAFTA-award winning It Was Alright in the 70s to air 20th September on Channel 4

Tuesday 20th September will see a brand new episode of the BAFTA-award winning It Was Alright in the 70s air at 10pm on Channel 4.

In this brand new episode of It Was Alright in the 70s we’ve more eye opening TV clips that will leave you both laughing and speechless as we ask what were we so afraid of in the 70s?

Matt Lucas narrates as we delve into some of the classic comedies, painfully honest documentaries, terrifying public information films and pointed satire of the time to explore exactly what made us anxious 40 years ago. If the telly of the time is anything to go by it seems we were terrified that almost anything could fray the moral fabric of the nation: from punk to pot, foreign diseases to free love, gay rights, women’s rights and newly arrived immigrants, society saw danger everywhere.

From discussion shows like Man Alive debating the danger of recreational drugs and Brass Tacks exploring the impact of a punk society, to The Goodies taking on the police and June Whitfield burning her bra in Scott on the Sex War, which (if any) of these threats were real, and which do we look back on and wonder, ‘What was all the fuss about?’. And, more than anything, were we looking to the wrong people to protect us from all these new influences, new ideas and newfound insecurities?

With first-hand accounts from the people who were making telly at the time, reactions from those who watched at home, and open astonishment from those too young to have lived through it first time around, we revisit a decade when it seemed there was always a new and scary threat just around the corner.

Sharing their memories from inside TV in the 70s are Barry Cryer, Janet Street-Porter and Bill Oddie. Remembering watching during that scary decade are Benjamin Zephaniah, Philippa Perry, Garry Bushell, Tom Robinson and Oona King, and seeing it all with the wide eyed wonder of first timers are David Morgan, Mark Watson, Suzi Ruffell, Angela Barnes and Nathan Caton.

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